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Drama. Passion. Tragedy. Romeo & Juliet performed by the Grand Rapids Ballet

Grand Rapids Ballet presents the epic love tragedy Romeo & Juliet to close the 2012-2013 season.
Stephen Sanford and Rachael Riley perform as Romeo and Juliet in Mario Radacovsky's "Romeo & Juliet"

Stephen Sanford and Rachael Riley perform as Romeo and Juliet in Mario Radacovsky's "Romeo & Juliet" /Andrew Terzes

Underwriting support from:

Romeo & Juliet, May 10-12 & 17-19

Peter Martin Wege Theatre - 341 Ellsworth SW

Tickets are $40 ($35 for seniors, $30 for children) and can be purchased at the Ballet Box Office (616) 454-4771 or through TicketmasterFor more information visit grballet.com.

The masked ball scene in Mario Radacovsky's "Romeo & Juliet"

The masked ball scene in Mario Radacovsky's "Romeo & Juliet" /Rob Schumaker

Grand Rapids Ballet presents "Romeo & Juliet"

Grand Rapids Ballet presents "Romeo & Juliet" /MIchael Auer

“When I first read Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet I thought to myself, now here is a true genius. Shakespeare took the strongest, most basic emotion of human life and created an entire play around it – love. Young love, passionate love, hate love and tragic love. Love is the centerpiece for all other feelings that come into play.” And so sparked the inspiration behind choreographer Mario Radacovsky’s original Romeo & Juliet, commissioned by the Grand Rapids Ballet in 2011. GRB presents its most requested work to close the 2012-2013 season May 10-12 and 17-19.

Patricia Barker, Artistic Director of Grand Rapids Ballet, met Radacovsky in 1999 while performing at the Gala des Etoiles in Montreal. He had just choreographed his first work and she instantly became a fan. “I was moved by the way he used movement - blending classical techniques with contemporary - and how he used lighting, giving dimension and breath to his work, taking us all on a journey though time,” says Barker. Over ten years later, he was the one who came to mind when she thought of creating a new Romeo & Juliet for the Grand Rapids Ballet.

The innovative production received rave reviews from audience and critics alike at its premiere in 2011 and has quickly become GRB’s most sought-after work. It has been performed throughout Michigan and received its European premiere last summer in Austria by Balet Bratislava. Barker could not have been happier with the response. “Mario’s concept and creativity was a great fit for our company and it was incredible to watch the journey that the dancers and choreographer took together. The final result was truly something that took your breath away – from the dramatic ensemble pieces to the intimate pas de deux, it left you enamored with the dancers and the story.”

 

“Mario Radacovsky's Romeo and Juliet, as performed by the Grand Rapids Ballet, was one of the most compelling, moving, and inspiring pieces of work I have seen in a long time. The look of the ballet is clean, clear and therefore emotionally revealing, and the passionate (and technically strong) performances of the dancers wrap the inherent drama of the story around everyone in the audience. I was mesmerized!” ~Gavin Larsen (former Oregon Ballet Theatre Principal dancer)

 

“Romeo & Juliet is a breathtaking tale of passions and emotions.” Four stars (out of four). 
~Jeffrey Kaczmarczyk, MLive

Grand Rapids Ballet presents the epic love tragedy Romeo & Juliet to close the 2012-2013 season. Performances with Mario Radacovsky’s May 10-12 & 17-19 at the Peter Martin Wege Theatre. Tickets are $40 ($35 for seniors, $30 for children) and may be purchased at the Ballet Box Office (616) 454-4771 or through Ticketmaster. The Peter Martin Wege Theatre is located at 341 Ellsworth SW in Grand Rapids, MI. For more information visit grballet.com.

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