The Rapidian

Calvin College Launches Campaign to Save the Student Activities Office

Student Activities Office (SAO), a beloved fixture of Calvin College and the West Michigan music scene, requires funding to remain intact. In partnership with students, Calvin College administrators seek ways to keep the program intact.
Ben Harper performs at Calvin College, 2000

Ben Harper performs at Calvin College, 2000 /Scott.wheeler for English Wikipedia CC BY 2.0

Calvin College administrators launched a fundraising campaign to save the Student Activities Office (SAO), a campus organization that offers concerts and cultural programming. The administration, in partnership with members of the #SaveSAO movement, calls SAO an integral part of Calvin College and the West Michigan community.

The campaign aims to raise $150,000 by June 1. Funding would support a full-time director over a four-year transitionary period.

“In order for the college to remain financially healthy, there will be a number of budget reductions in the coming year,” said SAO student leader Lyric Floria. “We believe that in the midst of this reality SAO remains central to the Calvin that we love.”

The campaign comes in response to growing concerns about the future of the college. President Michael LeRoy and Vice President for Student Life Sarah Visser hosted a town hall about SAO attended by over 250 students, faculty, and alumni in the Calvin College Chapel to discuss the issue.

Daniel Hickey, an employee of SAO, kicked off the tense dialogue with a call for transparent decision-making. He expressed his frustration that Chimes, the official student newspaper of Calvin College, published an article about SAO cuts before the administration announced its decision.

“Frankly, you’re late. You got burned by the newspaper doing the newspaper’s job,” said Hickey. “We’re coming here as serious individuals, we are going to demand serious answers.”

Visser, who was out of the country when Chimes released its article about SAO, stated that SAO would be reorganized, rather than ended entirely. The administration sought public input on how to maintain the mission of SAO, while pursuing cost-saving measures.

“A lot is still in process, and there are many possibilities,” said Visser, “I don’t have definitive answers for you on what next year will look like.”

According to Visser, SAO requires a $2.5 million endowment to maintain its current form. Due to declining enrollment and lost revenue, the administration felt compelled to make tough budgetary calls.

Faculty members suggested crowdfunding to maintain the services of SAO until a long-term restructuring plan was put forward.

“I could imagine a very large number of small donors collectively coming forward,” said Professor Larry Molnar.

Other audience members called for the administration to select a new SAO director with a willingness to voice dissent. SAO Director Ken Heffner called for the invitation of controversial acts such as the New Pornographers and Kendrick Lamar.

“Ken Heffner [is a] devil’s advocate,” said Professor Joseph Kuilema.

Members of the #SaveSAO movement maintain a lively discussion of SAO online. Over 3,000 Calvin-affiliated people participate in the the Save SAO Facebook page.

For 25 years, SAO received national attention for its annual concert series. Major stars such as the National, fun., and MGMT played for enormous crowds, while emerging acts broke out in intimate space of the Ladies Literary Club.

Concerts featured a question-and-answer session with the audience asking about spirituality and artistry. Heffner started each session with the question “what have you been reading lately?”

“We’re taking pop culture - a worldly thing - and we’re going to see what we can draw from that.,” said Patrick Jonker. “We’re discerning what has spiritual value, what we can learn from an artist regardless of what faith background is.”

SAO hosted film screening, lectures, and a popular biennial conference called the Festival of Faith and Music, featuring performances and speeches exploring themes of faith, that was discontinued in 2017. The Cultural Discerner program equips student leaders to host listening sessions and discussions about pop culture.

“During one session, someone played the song ‘Apeshit’ by the Carters, and we watched the video, which is maximal and loud and visually appealing,” said Molly Vanderwerp. “There was this moment of energy; we were dancing in that room. It reminded me why this work is important.”

Members of the SAVE SAO movement view SAO as an integral to Christian mission of Calvin College. They remain concerned about the appeal of Calvin College if SAO significantly changes its programming.

SAO is the best part of Calvin College,” said SAO employee John Williamson. “I love this school, but I’m worried we are losing our identity. The decision makers don’t know what they have on their hands.”

Calvin College administrators meet with students on a weekly basis to discuss SAO. Further announcements are expected by the end of the school year.

 

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