The Rapidian

In studio: GVSU Ghana Nsu - Clean Water Initiative

In two weeks, Uma will be traveling to Ghana with 30 water filters manufactured by local company Cascade Engineering to install in a village that's downstream from at least one chemical plant. Tune in
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About Catalyst Radio

Catalyst Radio is a weekly radio show with hosts Linda Gellasch and Denise Cheng that looks at the behind-the-scenes of Rapidian reporting as well as grassroots and nonprofit efforts around the community. The show comprises a media analysis and developments portion, interview segment and calendar of events. You can catch it on air at noon every Friday on WYCE 88.1 FM or streaming on the Grand Rapids Community Media Center Website.

This week, we interview Uma Mishra of the GVSU Ghana Nsu Project - Clean Water Initiative. In two weeks, Uma will be traveling to Ghana with 30 water filters manufactured by local company Cascade Engineering to install in a village that's downstream from at least one chemical plant. Tune into the interview tomorrow to learn how the project is being harmonized with cultural customs, how the project is affecting change in school curriculum, and what it means to have drinking water countless times dirtier than the Grand River.

The featured song of the week is Cool Water by Joni Mitchell.

 

MEDIA ANALYSIS

Go Daddy crowdsources TV ad ideas, runs first ad without scantily clad women
Go Daddy, a popular web hosting service, has been criticized for years for its use of scantily clad women in TV advertisements that don't have anything to do with the type of service it offers. After setting up a competition to solicit advertisements from fans for this year's Indianapolis 500, Go Daddy awarded $100,000 to the producers of a commercial that features a woman in a different light. As the first place winner by popular vote, the advertisement depicts a mother constantly bogged down by her kids' phone calls asking recipe details. Her solution is to create a Web site, hosted by Go Daddy, to stem the calls.
[Read more]

Publish2 launches New Exchange
Publish2 launched News Exchange, a wire sharing site, late last month. There was much talk leading up to the launch about its potential role as a competitor to the Associated Press' wire service. News Exchange provides a platform for news organizations, independent journalists and bloggers to share their content directly with one another in a community-based site.
[Read more]

First Hacks and Hackers conference turns out iPad applications in one weekend
Also in May, the first Hacks and Hackers conference took place in San Francisco. Hacks and Hackers is an organization that brings technologists and journalists to address issues in journalism with tech fixes. After putting on a code sprint—an event where programmers have a set amount of time to develop software code—attendees turned out 12 iPad applications. Of the 12, two were recognized as bests-in-show. The first, Citizen Kids, turned news consumption into a game for youth. Who's Reppin' me, the other application, sends users news information about their representatives's actions based on district/location.
[Read more]

Sitting duck state rep introduces legislation for reporter's license
Michigan state representative Bruce Patterson of Canton Township is on his way out, but before he goes, he's bringing up the vicarious issue of who counts as a journalist. Although he has no other backers in the state legislature, he's introduced legislation for registering journalists. Criteria include three years' experience, three writing samples, proof of a journalism or equivalent degree, a $10 registration fee and less tangible requirements such as good moral character.
[Read more]

WBEZ makes its way into the top 10 radio stations
WBEZ, Chicago's public radio station, has recently broken into the top ten of radio stations popular among the 25-54 age range according to Arbitron's estimates. Time will tell whether the ranking holds, and WBEZ's CEO is wary to celebrate quite yet. WBEZ is known for many nationally syndicated radio shows such as This American Life, Wait! Wait! Don't tell me! and is the force behind internet-radio citizen journalism project, Vocalo.org.
[Read more]

 

CALENDAR

Grand Rapids annual Festival of the Arts takes place this weekend, June 4-6 in Downtown Grand Rapids. There will be performances on six outdoor stages, art exhibits by some of West Michigan artists, food from area nonprofit organizations, art activities and more. All performances and exhibits and most activities are free. The Community Media Center's GRTV will also be streaming the festival live on its Web site starting at noon on Friday, June 4.
[More info]

The Division Avenue Arts Collective will host an opening reception for its latest themed art exhibit, "Weather Patterns," from 4 to 9 p.m. Saturday, June 5 at its 115 S. Division location. The exhibit will feature artwork that visualizes a sequence regularly found in comparable objects or events and incorporates the state of the atmosphere at a place and time.
[More info]

An International Folk Dancing group will meet from 7 to 9:30 Friday, June 11 at the Wealthy Theatre Annex 1110 Wealthy St. SE to explore folk dances from Europe, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the Americas. Beginners are invited. Intermediate and advanced dancers are invited to share their skills. The group averages about 20 dances per evening, alternating between easy dances, dances with somewhat more complicated patterns, and one or two really tough ones for the most advanced folks. A partner is not necessary, but bring comfortable dancing shoes. For more information, visit the GRCMC Web site. [More info]

The Grand Rapids Downtown Sidewalk Chalk Flood will take place from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, June 13 at Rosa Parks Circle. Last year's event attracted over 5,000 people. Over 20,000 pieces of sidewalk chalk will be available to the public to color the entire downtown area of Grand Rapids with the theme of spring.
[More info]

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