The Rapidian

National Salvation Army Week Is Underway

This dispatch was added by one of our Nonprofit Neighbors. It does not represent the editorial voice of The Rapidian or Community Media Center.

National Salvation Army Week is officially here and runs through Sunday. This week is set aside to remind the country of the comprehensive nature of the services The Salvation Army provides to every United States zip code.
The Salvation Army shield and flowers

The Salvation Army shield and flowers /The Salvation Army

Underwriting support from:

The Salvation Army in Kent County

The Salvation Army of Kent County has continued to serve year-round since first being organized in 1883 and in 2020 alone, provided critical services to nearly 30,000 individuals. Kent County’s net of programs and services casts wide and includes those that supply emergency food assistance, offer housing resources and energy bill assistance, support those struggling with substance use disorder through the Adult Rehabilitation Center and Turning Point Programs, provide programs that impact people of all ages at the Kroc Center and Fulton Heights Corps, and support disaster victims every time catastrophe strikes. During the COVID-19 pandemic, all of these programs and services have adapted to ensure the increased needs of families and individuals are met.

National Salvation Army Week is officially here and runs through Sunday. This week is set aside to remind the country of the comprehensive nature of the services The Salvation Army provides to every United States zip code. During this week, The Salvation Army of Kent County is encouraging community members to enlist in a monthly $25 donation to aid those families teetering on the verge of “pandemic poverty.”

National Salvation Army Week was first declared by President Dwight Eisenhower in 1954. In his proclamation nearly 70 years ago, President Eisenhower stated: “Among Americans, The Salvation Army has long been a symbol of wholehearted dedication to the cause of human brotherhood … Their work has been a constant reminder to us all that each of us is neighbor and kin to all Americans. Giving freely of themselves, the men and women of The Salvation Army have won the respect of us all.”

In 2001, President George W. Bush issued a new proclamation recognizing the week, noting: “During this week, I encourage Americans to express their appreciation for The Salvation Army's good works and to follow their example of serving a cause greater than themselves.”

“We appreciate the recognition that is given to us during this week,” said Major Glen Caddy, Divisional Commander. “The real heroes are the faithful staff and volunteers who give of themselves every day of the year in order to make life better for their neighbors. We would welcome your support in this effort.”

The global health crisis has created a new threat to a family’s stability: pandemic poverty. As life returns to normal for some, many continue to experience a heightened risk of falling below the poverty line and entering a multi-year cycle of challenges. The continued generosity of the Kent County community will help The Salvation Army keep families from crossing over the pandemic poverty line. Just $25 a month could be the difference between an unpaid and paid utility bill, or the difference between a full and an empty stomach.

Eighty-two cents of every dollar donated goes directly toward providing local programs and all the money stays within the community in which it was given.

To make a monthly donation, visit www.SAKentCounty.org or call (616) 459-3433.

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